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10 “Big” Words Everyone Should Know – Jersey Shore Style

July 27, 2010


Photo via MTV.com

Though you may never have to complete another analogy as long as you live, you can’t escape the SAT-like words that pepper our everyday vocabulary. From crossword puzzles to newspaper articles, there are certain “big” words that frequently catch us off guard and leave us befuddled.

Below is a list of what I believe to be the top 10 offenders, along with their definitions and usages (inspired by my recent visit to the Jersey Shore).

auspicious

–adjective
1. promising success; propitious; opportune; favorable
2. favored by fortune; prosperous; fortunate

“Snooki hoped that her new tube dress from Forever 21 would bring  auspicious hook-ups last night.”

capricious

–adjective
subject to, led by, or indicative of whim; erratic

“Though he normally doesn’t mess around with grenades, The Situation’s capricious hook-up with the busted girl could most aptly be explained by drunkenness.”

ephemeral

–adjective
lasting a very short time; short-lived

“Upon making out with Snooki, The Situation’s interest in the guidette was ephemeral.”

eponymous

–adjective
giving one’s name to a tribe, place, etc.

“If the Situation and Pauly D open up a laundromat, they would either call it ‘Buds and Suds’ or something eponymous like ‘The Situation and Pauly D’s Laundromat.'”

impecunious

–adjective
having little or no money; penniless; poor

“Should Snooki ever decide to dance for money, she will surely be impecunious.”

inchoate

(note that this was the most commonly looked-up word in the New York Times)
–adjective
1. not yet completed or fully developed; rudimentary
2. just begun; incipient
3. not organized; lacking order

“J. Woww’s budding relationship with her big-spender beau was inchoate when she chose to cheat on him with Pauly D.”

insipid

–adjective
1. without distinctive, interesting, or stimulating qualities; vapid
2. without sufficient taste to be pleasing, as food or drink; bland

“While some may view ham and water as an insipid drunk munch, J. Woww looks forward to the combo after a long night of partying.”

nefarious

-adjective
extremely wicked or villainous

“While some may view the punch to Snooki’s face a nefarious act, others think b*tch deserved it.”

phlegmatic

–adjective
1. not easily excited to action or display of emotion; apathetic; sluggish
2. self-possessed, calm, or composed

“When a fly jam comes on in the club, Pauly D cannot remain phlegmatic – he must give in to his guido instincts and pump his fists.”

prodigal

–adjective
1. wastefully or recklessly extravagant
2. giving or yielding profusely; lavish (usually fol. by of  or with ): prodigal of smiles; prodigal with money
3. lavishly abundant; profuse

“Unless it’s spent on the gym, tanning, or laundry, Pauly D feels that all other purchases are prodigal.”

spurious

–adjective
not genuine, authentic, or true; not from the claimed, pretended, or proper source; counterfeit

“Sammy Sweetheart’s hair extensions are a spurious attempt at long, flowing locks.”

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4 Comments leave one →
  1. July 27, 2010 6:14 am

    I give this post 5 out of 5 fist pumps!!!

  2. Rosemary permalink
    July 27, 2010 11:41 am

    Holley, I have one word for you “fuggedaboutit” Great blog. It was funnier than that show.

    • Holley Simmons permalink*
      July 27, 2010 11:42 am

      Hahaha! Thanks Grandma! Love you.

  3. jpmoonkorea permalink
    February 19, 2011 10:42 pm

    i need 2 increase my vocabulary. i will try and use these words throughout the week.

    ps. are you a fulltime freelance writer?

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